Posts Tagged With ‘cities’


“Constructivism isn’t laissez-faire”

This, from ateacherswonderings, is rather impressive.

how do you teach an abstract concept such as “system” to 2nd graders?

Simple: I divided the class in three groups and gave each group something different: a toy car, a pen and a puzzle. The trick that the kids didn’t know…was that each was missing a piece! They tried to assemble the pen (hey, but the spring was missing!), the toy car (oh no, a wheel is not there!) and the tree-puzzle (again, part of it was missing). The kids thought, argued, rearranged…”Cri, we can’t finish it!!”

So we sat down and discussed . Their conclusions: – a system is made of interconnected parts (yes, Ioana said that magic word!) – if a part is missing the entire system will not work (Elenis formulated it exactly that way!)

Some will ask, “So what? No big deal. How do you know they UNDERSTOOD the concept at a deeper level?” Well, I asked students to prove they understood it. How? By asking them to actually give an example, illustrate a system that is familiar to them and then share with us.

What systems did they draw and illustrate? Lots! From the anatomy of a bunny (heart, bones, lungs etc) to complex machines, buildings, laptops, musical instruments, plants. All included parts of the system and each student explained HOW it worked and how they were connected.

It’s the beginning of a wonderful exploration of cities. I’m not a huge fan of textbooks but this makes me think that textbooks should be replaced with case-studies for teachers.



Maths and Cities

This is food for thought in its own right.

With teacher googles on it is a rich seam of cross-curricular exploration. Will need to rejig it so it is Year 6 friendly but there is LOADS of stuff here to help children realise that maths is a language that can connect e.g. science, PSHE, history, business studies and geography.



oobject » 12 unrecognizable before and after views of cities

Despite the appearance of permanence that historic buildings create, many if not most of the worlds famous cities have been almost entirely destroyed either by war, property speculation or Ayn Randian architects. They have been rebuilt, either as replicas (Warsaw) or even in the image of the culture that destroyed them (Hiroshima). Here are images where either we or others have matched up locations for incredible before and after shots.

Source: here


oobject » 12 unrecognizable before and after views of cities

Despite the appearance of permanence that historic buildings create, many if not most of the worlds famous cities have been almost entirely destroyed either by war, property speculation or Ayn Randian architects. They have been rebuilt, either as replicas (Warsaw) or even in the image of the culture that destroyed them (Hiroshima). Here are images where either we or others have matched up locations for incredible before and after shots.

Source: here


oobject » 12 unrecognizable before and after views of cities

Despite the appearance of permanence that historic buildings create, many if not most of the worlds famous cities have been almost entirely destroyed either by war, property speculation or Ayn Randian architects. They have been rebuilt, either as replicas (Warsaw) or even in the image of the culture that destroyed them (Hiroshima). Here are images where either we or others have matched up locations for incredible before and after shots.

Source: here


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