The Tyranny of Stuctureless

Contrary to what we would like to believe, there is no such thing as a structureless group. Any group of people of whatever nature that comes together for any length of time for any purpose will inevitably structure itself in some fashion.

Goodbye to a not-so-good scientist | Sue Blackmore

I feel sorry for my old friend and colleague, but I can only conclude that she is, in both her successes and her failures, the architect of her own fate. In her determination to get to the top, she may be an example of a woman having to fight even harder than a man to achieve such goals.

Official Google Blog: A new approach to China

We [google] have taken the unusual step of sharing information about these attacks with a broad audience not just because of the security and human rights implications of what we have unearthed, but also because this information goes to the heart of a much bigger global debate about freedom of speech.

This is not class war | Ed Balls

That's why debates that set out the choices will be so important. And, while the leaders' TV debates will inevitably draw the attention, I hope we will see the cabinet and shadow cabinet debating too. This week I will ask my opposite numbers to agree dates, and will propose that we invite parents, teachers, governors and pupils – the people who will be affected directly by the election choice – to ask the questions.

How Robber Barons hijacked the “Victorian Internet”

In many ways this story is far field from our contemporary debates about network management, file sharing, and the perils of protocol discrimination. But the main questions seem to remain the same—to what degree will we let Western Union then and ISPs now pick winners and losers on our communications backbone?

How Robber Barons hijacked the "Victorian Internet"

In many ways this story is far field from our contemporary debates about network management, file sharing, and the perils of protocol discrimination. But the main questions seem to remain the same—to what degree will we let Western Union then and ISPs now pick winners and losers on our communications backbone?

How Robber Barons hijacked the "Victorian Internet"

In many ways this story is far field from our contemporary debates about network management, file sharing, and the perils of protocol discrimination. But the main questions seem to remain the same—to what degree will we let Western Union then and ISPs now pick winners and losers on our communications backbone?