Praxis – The Rarest of the Three

Aristotle divided human activities into three broad categories: thinking (theoria), making (poiesis), and doing (praxis). Put another way, I suppose, they are the why, the what, and the how.

In very coarse terms, and trying to link it to rhetoric,  I wonder how it matches the various posts I read on Twitter and blogs. The categories match well but I’m struggling to find indicators for good praxis posts.

Theoria posts 

There are a huge amount of posts or tweets on theoria (even more so if you include feeling in that category).

Examples might include:

  • Hack wisdom (“Teachers lose their way when they lose their why”)
  • Out-of-date management speak (“Teachers are change agents”)
  • Truisms (“Trust is important”)
  • Links to research papers & discussions of it (the odd one out in this category)
  • Many of the alpha-tweeters – they’re fascinating to read but seem to follow the same trajectory that bedevils management, becoming further and further removed from real teaching.

Poiesis posts

These are infinitely more useful in many ways but harder to sift through.

Examples might include:

  • Links to lesson plans that have been tried
  • Pictures of displays
  • Pictures of student work
  • Comments about days at school or lessons

Praxis posts

Perhaps I just haven’t found the right people to follow yet, but these for me are the rarest and hardest to find.

There are some who do this by regularly blending theoria and poiesis – Cristina and Harry are two excellent examples that spring to mind – but this category, while it’s an El Dorado of sorts, seems far harder to pin down. It’s easy to come up with examples to fit the categories above but Praxis seems far more mercurial.

The best indicator I have at the moment is both the sort of blend mentioned above and the richness of discussion. If anyone has any better ways of zeroing in (or recommendations of people to follow), I’d love to hear.

 

Social Media, Technographics & Schools

Getting social media off the ground in schools is hard. And it’s hard even when staff know some IT basics.

I’m not sure this is practically helpful, but it does at least provide a framework for discussions. Forrester have classified various social media types and then used their research data to show you what the likelihood of your staff or parents belonging to any of those categories is.

More here

The Facebookisation of the enterprise – confused of calcutta

Generation M (the mobile, multimedia, multitasking generation, born post 1982) is in the workplace. They don’t have to imagine any of this. It is how they live their lives. And if we want access to their talent, we need to change.

Which is where the enterprise needs to look a bit like Facebook. Responsible for identifying, authenticating and permissioning people, making sure that appropriate controls are in place from a privacy and confidentiality perspective. Responsible for providing an environment, a platform, for people to congregate electronically. A marketplace, a bazaar. A place where people converse with each other, share their interests, identify inventories, discover prices, negotiate, trade. A place where the things that need to be recorded get recorded, as in everyday life. Cash withdrawals, credit card usage, access to secure premises, and so on. A place where the things that need to be shared are made simply shareable, without the nonsense of bad DRM.

Source: here

The Facebookisation of the enterprise – confused of calcutta

Generation M (the mobile, multimedia, multitasking generation, born post 1982) is in the workplace. They don’t have to imagine any of this. It is how they live their lives. And if we want access to their talent, we need to change.

Which is where the enterprise needs to look a bit like Facebook. Responsible for identifying, authenticating and permissioning people, making sure that appropriate controls are in place from a privacy and confidentiality perspective. Responsible for providing an environment, a platform, for people to congregate electronically. A marketplace, a bazaar. A place where people converse with each other, share their interests, identify inventories, discover prices, negotiate, trade. A place where the things that need to be recorded get recorded, as in everyday life. Cash withdrawals, credit card usage, access to secure premises, and so on. A place where the things that need to be shared are made simply shareable, without the nonsense of bad DRM.

Source: here

Wikipedia losing contributors

Volunteers have been departing the project that bills itself as "the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit" faster than new ones have been joining, and the net losses have accelerated over the past year. In the first three months of 2009, the English-language Wikipedia suffered a net loss of more than 49,000 editors, compared to a net loss of 4,900 during the same period a year earlier, according to Spanish researcher Felipe Ortega, who analyzed Wikipedia's data on the editing histories of its more than three million active contributors in 10 languages.

Eight years after Wikipedia began with a goal to provide everyone in the world free access to "the sum of all human knowledge," the declines in participation have raised questions about the encyclopedia's ability to continue expanding its breadth and improving its accuracy.

Source: here

SpeEdChange

If, as Foucault says, power is “neither given, nor exchanged, nor recovered, but rather exercised, and that it only exists in action" (Kelly 1994), then the powerlessness of many teachers in relation to their own professional development may be seen as a consequence of inaction – or more specifically – of the lack of a conceptual space which allows them freedom to act.

Source: here

McKinsey: What Matters: Using technology to improve workforce collaboration

Taking a systematic view, however, helps bring some of the key issues into focus. Our research suggests that improvements depend upon getting a better fix on who actually is doing the collaborating within companies, as well as understanding the details of how that interactive work is done. Just as important is deciding how to support interactions with technology—in particular, Web 2.0 tools such as social networks, wikis, and video. There is potential for sizeable gains from even modest improvements. Our survey research shows that at least 20 percent and as much as 50 percent of collaborative activity results in wasted effort. And the sources of this waste—including poorly planned meetings, unproductive travel time, and the rising tide of redundant e-mail communications, just to name a few—are many and growing in knowledge-intense industries.

Source: here

Twitter vs. the Dunbar Number, and the Rise of Weak Ties

the fact that new social technology is allowing us to grow the ranks of our weak ties and passively tracked relationships should not be glossed over as an aside, or also-ran, or less than exciting and amazing development… It should be embossed, stuffed, mounted, lacquered, bronzed, and put up on a pedestal for all to admire in perpetuity. Word.

Source: here